Thematic stream: The concept of translation in Africa

Call for Papers ASAUK 2020

Image: Kwame Nkrumah Mausoleum, Accra

The 28 biennial ASAUK conference (8-10 September 2020) at Cardiff University will feature the thematic panel The concept of translation in Africa: challenging Translation and Interpreting Studies.

The stream will provide a space where translation and interpreting studies scholars exploring the African context can meet and discuss their research, present their findings, interact and learn from each other. Additionally, the conference will be an opportunity to showcase current research in translation and interpreting studies in an interdisciplinary context. The stream aims at placing TIS research in the wider African Studies sphere.

Organisers

  • Prof Kobus Marais, University of the Free State, South Africa
  • Dr David Orrego-Carmona, Aston University, UK/University of the Free State, South Africa

“The ASAUK 2020 conference is an opportunity to be part of a collegiate and supportive event and to share your research with colleagues from around the world”.

Practical details

  • Call for Papers deadline: Sunday 22 March 2020
  • Conference dates: 8-10 September 2020
  • Thematic stream information
  • Submission details available here
  • Conference rates
  • Venue: Cathays campus, Cardiff University (Cardiff, Wales)

Panel introduction

Africa hosts 30% of the world’s languages but despite this high degree of multilingualism, it has largely been overlooked in translation studies as a result of a Western bias (Marais 2014)*. Translation and Interpreting Studies (TIS) as an academic discipline emerged in Europe, concurrently with the professionalisation of translation. However, translation and interpreting as human activities are not relegated to professional spaces. Exploring the reality of multilingual communication and mediation in African contexts is not only desirable but essential to understand the instances when translation emerges as a solution to basic societal needs. In an interconnected world, key communication concepts cannot be limited to European or Western realities.

Experiences such as the School for Translation Studies in Africa and the African Translation and Interpreting Studies Writing Workshop have laid the foundation for cooperation and dialogue. This thematic stream will offer a platform for African and Africa-focused TIS researchers to discuss essential translation and interpreting concepts within an African context.

  • Marais, Kobus. 2014. Translation theory and development studies: A complexity theory approach. Routledge.
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David Orrego-Carmona
Lecturer in translation studies

My research interests include translation technologies, subtitlin, non-professional translation and training.